Skip to main content top
::: Current Location: Home > Publications > researches > Effects of Food and Agriculture Education Instruction in Taitung: A Case Study of Teachers from Dawang Elementary School
font small  font large font print shared to FB

Effects of Food and Agriculture Education Instruction in Taitung: A Case Study of Teachers from Dawang Elementary School

2021-03-19

Effects of Food and Agriculture Education Instruction in Taitung: A Case Study of Teachers from Dawang Elementary School

Ching-Ching Wu


Abstract

In the past, studies on the effects of food and agriculture education instruction conducted by the TTDARES were directed at students. Average scores from post-course surveys on the indexes of knowledge, attitude, and behavior have indeed been higher than pre-course scores with significant differences in some areas. The aim of the courses is to foster good dietary habits and concepts in children. But little research has been done with teachers as the subject. The author of this study conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with three teachers (one first/second-grade teacher, one third/fourth-grade teacher, and on fifth/sixth-grade teacher) from Dawang Elementary School. The challenges and problems encountered by the teachers while providing instruction are summarized as follows: 1) Teachers view their own knowledge on food and agriculture as insufficient, 2) they obtain information on food and agriculture through a diversity of channels, 3) the use of food education experiences is the easiest way to trigger the motivation to learn, and 4) the “3+6 aspects” food and agriculture education concept framework advocated by National Taiwan University Professor Lin Ru-ping helps teachers grasp the orientation of food and agriculture education instruction. The author proposes the following suggestions: 1) Provide the example of lectures given by agriculture experts, regularly hold related lectures and workshops, integrate cross-disciplinary resources, reduce the pressure of instruction on teachers, and foster teachers’ agriculture education concepts and skills; 2) make use of the themed website pages created by Council of Agriculture research institutes/research and extension stations as resources for preparing classes; and 3) design courses differently based on the age of the students. After gaining an understanding of the challenges teachers have faced through this study and providing solutions, the author expects the concepts taught by the teachers will be applied by the children more frequently in their daily lives.